Monthly Archives: December 2018

Implications Of Bill C-46 – Impaired Driving

The landscape around drinking and driving has changed with the coming into force of new impaired driving laws on December 18, 2018. The Bill charges the wording of the offence to prohibiting a blood alcohol concentration of over .80 within 2 hours of the time of driving. The additional of the 2 hours of the time of driving eliminates the defence of ‘bolus drinking’ where an accused person would argue that they drank a large amount of alcohol just before driving and therefore were not impaired at the time of driving. What is possible here is that, based on the rate of absorption of alcohol into a blood, a person’s behaviour could be criminalized for driving while having alcohol in their system, even if their ability to drive was not actually impaired by the alcohol.

Perhaps the biggest change for us as police officers is that we will now be able to ask for an ASD demand of any lawfully stopped driver, regardless whether we have a reasonable suspicion that they have been drinking. Prior to this change, we needed at least a reasonable suspicion that someone had been drinking. This threshold was a relatively low one to meet: the admission of consumption of alcohol, often coupled with any indicia of impairment, such as glossy eyes or an odour of alcohol, etc. would be enough to give us grounds for an ASD demand. The ability to ask for a demand absent any suspicion of impairment has attracted much criticism from lawyers for violating the right to be free from search and seizure, and will very likely be the subject of a constitutional challenge in the courts.

In addition, Parliament created an offence of having too much drug in your blood. The judge doesn’t have to find that it impaired you, only that the concentration of the drug exceeded the legal limit. Here is the link: https://www.canlii.org/en/ca/laws/regu/sor-2018-148/latest/sor-2018-148.html

Marihuana is looked at differently: if the driver has between 2 and 5 ng/ml of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in his or her blood, then it’s a criminal offence, but it has a lower penalty than regular impaired driving. If the driver has 5ng/ml or more of THC in his or her blood, then it’s punishable by the same penalty as impaired driving or over 80mg% of alcohol. As well, driving with a combination of 50mg% of alcohol and 2.5ng of THC in the blood also carries the same penalty as impaired driving. Although this table is not exhaustive, I’ve attempted to summarize the important changes for officers (I apologize for the table format – WordPress is not user-friendly for creating tables!):

Offence (CC) Old (CC) New (CC) Changes
Dangerous
Driving
249 320.13(1) No substantive change but simplified as
conveyance (new) rather than separate
paragraph offences for motor vehicle, vessel, aircraft, etc. (old).
 
Impaired
Driving
253(1)(a) 320.14(1)(a) No substantive change but now specifies
impairment to any degree.
       
.08 or Over 253(1)(b) 320.14(1)(b) The offence
changes from
having too
much alcohol
in your blood
while driving to having too
much alcohol
in your blood
in the 2 hours
after driving. 
Also, old was
“exceeds 80mg%” – new is
“equal to or
exceeds
80mg%”. Note – the exceptions are given in
subsection (5).
 
Over Drug
Limit
253(3)(a) 320.14(1)(c) The offence is
committed in
the 2 hours 
after driving.
For THC
(marihuana)
there are two
limits: 2ng/mL and 5ng/mL
Note – the
exceptions are given in
subsection (6).
 
Lower
Marihuana
Limit
253(3)(b) 320.14(4) Lower
penalties for 
2ng/mL of THC (marihuana).
 
Over Limit for Alcohol & Drug Combined 253(3)(c) 320.14(1)(d) 50mg% alcohol + 2.5ng/mL of
THC.
 
Refusal 254(5) 320.15(1) Wording added “knowing that a demand has
been made”
and added
separate
offences of 
liability
regarding 
respecting
injury or death at time demand made.
 
Failure to Stop/Remain 252 320.16(1) Old offence was a specific intent offence – “with intent to escape civil or
criminal
liability”. New
offence is a
general intent
offence – the
Crown need not prove any
purpose for the flight. 
Reputable
presumption – “without
reasonable
excuse”
 
Flight from
Police
249.1 320.17 Simpler
language but
repealed bodily harm and
death offences.  As well, only
mentions
“motor vehicle or vessel”, not
conveyance as
the other new
provisions have
 
Driving While
Prohibited
259(4) 320.18(1) Change of
language from
“disqualified”
to “prohibited” – no substantive change.

 

I expect a lot of constitutional arguments in the months and years to come, especially since the new legislation now allows, where legislation compels drivers to report accidents (e.g. provincial Motor Vehicle / Highway Traffic Acts), police to use that information to form grounds for demands.  I’ve made several posts over the years on courts ruling that “statutory compelled statements/reports” are inadmissible when pursuing a simultaneous criminal investigation, so this one will be interesting. Also, because the drug screening equipment isn’t perfect, and gives false positives, defence will argue it’s unconstitutional to use it for sure.  One final note for this post: because of the changes in the presumption sections, breath technicians will need new certificates which detail the results of blank and standard alcohol tests. If you’re a breath technician, you’ll have to start using these new ones now.

 

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Filed under Impaired Driving, Recent Case Law, Search and Seizure

Can police charge you with impaired driving if you drunkenly drift down a river on a raft or canoe?

In April 2017, Ontario Provincial Police laid impaired driving charges against a 37-year-old man (David Sillars) who was allegedly drunk and tipped a canoe on the Muskoka River near Bracebridge.  An eight-year-old boy who was in the canoe was swept over a nearby waterfall. Emergency crews tried CPR, and took the boy to the hospital, but he later died of his injuries.

Here are some links to a couple of the news articles around this incident: https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/canada-set-to-remove-drunk-canoeing-as-an-impaired-driving-offence;

https://globalnews.ca/news/3365913/boy-8-dies-after-canoe-capsizes-near-bracebridge/;

https://globalnews.ca/news/4569883/toronto-man-on-trial-for-impaired-operation-of-a-canoe-causing-childs-death/

The impaired driving legislation that went before Parliament in September-October 2017 sought changes to the definition of a vessel so that it “does not include a vessel that is propelled exclusively by means of muscular power.”  That didn’t sit well with the Canadian Safe Boating Council, who testified before the House of Commons committee studying the bill. This meant canoes and kayaks and other “vessels” propelled exclusively by muscular power would not be considered as “vessels” under the Criminal Code. During the Justice Committee hearings, a number of different agencies, including the Canadian Safe Boating Council, made submissions against this exclusion. The proposed definition excluding “vessels” propelled exclusively by muscular power was negatively reflected in a number of media reports provided by the Crown. Statistics were provided in the CSBC’s submissions, which reflected the increase in the number of non-motorized vessels propelled exclusively by muscular power. Ultimately, the exclusion of “vessels” exclusively propelled by muscular power was removed from the final draft of the definition of “vessel,” which was presented to Parliament for ratification.

Fast forward to this month, R. v. Sillars 2018 ONCJ 816. Sillars was charged with impaired operation of a vessel causing death, operating a vessel with more than 80 mg of alcohol in 100 ml of blood, and dangerous operation of a vessel. He was also charged with criminal negligence causing death. One of the key issues raised by both counsel respecting the first three charges was whether a canoe is included in the term “vessel” contained in Part VIII — Offences Against the Person and Reputation. Both counsel were in agreement that s. 214 CC does not provide a comprehensive or complete definition of “vessel;” in fact, it does not provide any definition at all. It would have been a simple task for Parliament to clearly indicate in s. 214 a comprehensive and inclusive definition of the term, “vessel,” yet it did not (the definition does include a “hovercraft”).

The case is an interesting read for someone that wishes to know more on the judge’s reasoning, but in essence the judge said at para. 31:

It is my view, the danger of harm is equally present whether a person is operating a canoe or a motor boat with a 5 hp. motor or a 150 hp. motor and their ability to do so is impaired by alcohol, however slight. Operating a canoe while impaired is sufficiently morally culpable to warrant the stigma of a criminal sanction. The danger of harm is to the person or persons operating the canoe, or the passengers in the canoe or other persons operating small vessels in the vicinity or those coming to assist when an emergency occurs as a result of the person operating the canoe being impaired, over 80 or operating dangerously.

It was the judge’s finding that the term “vessel” contained in s. 253(1)(a), s. 253(1)(b), and s. 249(1)(b) CC includes a canoe. At para. 60:

Consequently, for all of the reasons set out in these reasons it is my view Parliament intended to include vessels propelled exclusively by muscular power, including canoes, in the Criminal Code offences of impaired operation of a “vessel,” operating a “vessel” with greater than 80 mg alcohol/100 ml of blood and dangerous operation of a “vessel.”

“…any kind of activity involving the use of a vessel, including those propelled exclusively by muscular power, is inherently dangerous given the activity is on water, where the depth of the water is usually greater than a person’s height and the proficiency of members of the public respecting their ability to swim is considerably varied” (Sillars, at para. 48).

“…Certainly the purpose of the Criminal Code offences being considered here is to protect members of the public travelling on Canada’s waterways from harm, the operators themselves, passengers in the “vessel,” other operators of “vessels,” with or without passengers and anyone providing assistance when an emergency occurs as a result of the consumption of alcohol or drugs or both” (Sillars, at para. 57).

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Filed under Impaired Driving, Interesting Read